Exporting the written code from a project

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JonasM
Posts: 2
Joined: Saturday 22 August, 2020 - 11:31

Exporting the written code from a project

Post by JonasM »

Hello eyeryone,

I am currently using Enterprise in a project for one of my classes in university. It is required to make a detailed documentation about the project and my professor specifically asked me to include all written codes from my Model.
Therefore my question:

Is there a way to access and summerize all written codes in a project ? Ideally in a format, that shows clearly which piece of code belongs to a given part of a specific atom (i.e."Configuration of Server4.trigger on exit: <code>") ?

My only option by now is to create a screenshot of every window of code in my Project and to label them all manually. Given that there is a large number of atoms in my Project, that would be very inconvenient.
In case, that there is no option to do it in the way described above: Could anyone please give me a good and professional alternative to document my codes in the project ?
Perhaps a universal code, that you can acces somewhere in the program.

If anyone were to help me out here, I would be very grateful for any response.

best regards
JonasM
JonasM
Posts: 2
Joined: Saturday 22 August, 2020 - 11:31

Re: Exporting the written code from a project

Post by JonasM »

Edit: I am using Enterprise Version 10.2
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HarryBunnik
Posts: 344
Joined: Monday 07 February, 2011 - 11:22

Re: Exporting the written code from a project

Post by HarryBunnik »

Hi JonasM,

There is the option to open the model file in a text-program (like notepad++). This will show everything that is within the model, but will also contain quite some stuff that you're not interested in. And you'll need some basic understanding how it is built up.
But at least you get all without having to click all the way through your model. And the chance of missing something is also not so big.

Other options would involve writing code to extract the information you want, but since there are many atoms and each atom has the code on a different attribute, this is also quite time-consuming.

The third option would be to go into the atom editor and go over each atom and check all the attributes. With this solution you don't have to open each GUI, but can access code by double-clicking on those attribute entries that are of interest.

These are the ways that I can quickly think of that might help you.

Gr. Harry
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